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Manga Poll
When was the last time you read a non-manga related book outside of school purely for pleasure?
Right now!
A few days ago
A few weeks ago
A few months ago
Over a year ago
So long ago that I don't remember
 
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News Article
New Poll - Known Languages
This week's poll comes from our member ashi. We're just curious how many languages you proficiently know. Interpret that how you want, but I guess the typical meaning would be that you can more or less read, speak, and listen to stuff in that language. (And the comment next to each answer is just for fun, so don't take it the wrong way.) And yes, we're assuming you know at least English, as this is primarily an English website.

You can submit poll ideas here (and try to keep them manga/anime-related):
http://www.mangaupdates.com/showtopic.php?tid=3903

Question: How much ecchi does a good series need?
Choices:
Lots and lots! - votes: 1438 (10.4%)
Just enough to make it funny - votes: 5964 (43.2%)
None at all - votes: 6408 (46.4%)
There were 13810 total votes.
The poll ended: April 28th 2012

Yes, I know I forgot the option of "Don't care," but it was too late when I realized my mistake. With most votes going to the "none" option, I'm curious to see if that means ecchi is not necessary to making a good series or if that means no ecchi makes a series good. But that won't be a future poll...
Posted by lambchopsil on April 28th 9:00am Comments ( 119 )  [ View ]  [ Add ]
Comments

» giinko on April 28th, 2012, 2:31am

Five or more. Seems like I'm bragging but who cares, I do feel kind of cool that I know all these languages.
Deutsch (I'm a German), English (2nd language, very fluently), français (enough to nderstand books and newspapers, still learning), español (2nd year, still learning), tiếng Việt (mother tongue, though I don't use it often anymore), にほんご (I'm still struggling with hiragana and kanji)

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» geowrian on April 28th, 2012, 2:41am

Where did you learn Japanese? I'm just asking because usually kana is the very first thing taught/learned. It would be very unusual to be "proficient" in Japanese without have a firm grasp on the kana or at least around 2,000 of the most commonly used kanji.

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» giinko on April 28th, 2012, 3:08am

in Germany, Volkshochchule, you start with Hiragana.

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» geowrian on April 28th, 2012, 3:31am

Say what? Hiragana is a part of kana. Kana is composed of Katakana and Hiragana. You can start with either, but usually both are covered completely before the first semester ends. I hate to say this, but did you read the word "proficiently" in the question? I've been learning the language for a few years now, but I'm very far from proficient in it. To be proficient, you really should have a strong understanding in reading/writing (in kana and kanji), speaking, listening, grammar, vocabulary, etc.

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» giinko on April 28th, 2012, 5:28am

I'm really sorry that you can't master the language after such a long time of learning. As for the programm how they teach us there, go ask them. Did I say I know it "proficiently"? If you talk to me in that language, yes, I can understand you perfectly well and answer you perfectly as well. So what if I can't write it exactly, as for your information, all my life I have been using language with the alphabet, so I learn the words in romaji first, then learn the writing style.

If you know the language, nobody ask you to write a spotless flawless essay in it. So you talk with your friend from other countries or your business partner by showing them your newly written novel in their language? So you call a child who's learning to write: "hey, you don't know the language at all?"

Nowadays all business partners contact each other in English through e-mails or other important documents. Do you really need to write fluently all languages to say you know it? Even a German teacher after so many years teaching can sometimes make mistake or is not sure how to write the word. Maybe for other language it's different but that's only an example.

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» geowrian on April 28th, 2012, 9:24am

Please don't be passive aggressive with me ("I'm sorry that you can't...").

Your comment is a response to the current poll. The current poll asks "How many languages do you know proficiently?". You answered ""Five or more" and mentioned the five. Therefore, the reasonable implication is that you were saying you know Japanese proficiently. However, I seriously doubt that's the case. Reading and writing are critical components of a language. Kana is literally one of the first things you learn, including how to read and write it. Kanji is also important to know how to recognize and write, and there are a couple thousand that are used in everyday situations. Good luck trying to navigate streets, read signs, read the paper, etc., w/o knowing both kana and kanji. Many places don't use the furigana on kanji either, so knowing how to read the Kanji is important.

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» kawaiiusagichan on April 28th, 2012, 10:25am

Agreed, hiragana and katakana are the abc's of japanese, I can hardly believe anyone can be proficient at Japanese without memorizing them. Learning in romanji just seems... elementary.

Hey, don't take it too hard, we're all learning.

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» giinko on April 28th, 2012, 3:44pm

Here's another way: Try asking people. I actually think it will be much quicker learning the language by talking and listening, since I lived in Japan when I was small, all I can remember is how to speak, now I want to learn the letters properly again. I doubt one can say that one doesn't knwo the language in that case.
If you want people not to get annoyed by your comments, learn how to write one that has no such effect. Otherwise, live with it or continue to discuss.
You start with kana first, nobody's saying otherwise. Would you like me to record my lesson as proof that we start with hiragana, which you have to learn by yourself later on, and then kanji? Nobody's saying katakana's not important, but we just do it later on or the students should learn by themselves.
Well, how about just leave it at that, in 2 years I'll be 19 and I am pretty sure I can reach to your level.

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» geowrian on April 29th, 2012, 3:31pm

1) Being "proficient", as you claimed in your initial comment in response to the poll, generally requires knowing how to at least read the language. See "...I guess the typical meaning would be that you can more or less read, speak, and listen..." regarding a typical meaning. I guess you can cut reading out of your personal definition, but I personally feel that it's really an essential component of any language.

2) I never made any such claim to "not get annoyed by your comments". I am merely responding to your claims and adding my own input, rational, and some opinion. You might find that annoying, but it's not my prerogative to annoy you. However, I never made any personal attacks on you, but you were passive aggressive towards me, as denoted in my previous quote. I noted it wasn't appreciated and moved on. Please do the same.

3) <redacticed> - I'm not looking to start any kind of argument or flame war. I'll just leave it knowing the entire kana (meaning both hiragana and katakana) are critical components to the Japanese language. Usually they are covered early on, and whichever one you learn first is irrelevant. Learning both eventually is crucial, and institutions that put an emphasis on one over the other is doing a disservice (although it's not uncommon anymore).

I don't think there's anywhere else to take this conversation so I'm bowing out. I sincerely wish you good luck in your studies of the language.

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» Unknown on April 28th, 2012, 4:17am

Post Deleted

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» maine12329 on April 28th, 2012, 2:37am

Do dialects count? biggrin

english, jap, chinese, korean, malay +++++

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» Unknown on April 28th, 2012, 4:18am

Post Deleted

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» philip72 on May 4th, 2012, 6:09pm

I hope so as I can then add Scots to my list.

Does anyone else find the the way the first option is posed kind of douchey?
I'm a Canadian so it's no skin off my back, but if I was American, I'd say the person who created the poll was a bit of a dick.

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» Hanae on April 28th, 2012, 2:46am

Does my native language count as the language I proficiently know? Or is this poll just about foreign languages?

By the way, guys, please notice the word "proficiently". I know the basics of 2 languages beside English (Japanese and German), I could have a simple conversation in them, but it doesn't mean that I'm proficient.

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» PrincessVera on April 28th, 2012, 3:05am

There are (a) a lot of liars (b) a lot of people who don't know the meaning of the word "proficiently" or (c) people counting programming languages as real languages. There's a high proportion of bilingual speakers in the world (more people are at least bilingual than not), and knowing four languages proficiently might be possible if you're an immigrant to/from wildly different multilingual countries (like somewhere in urban Asia to somewhere in urban Europe). But once you get to five there is a HUGE decrease in the percentage of people in the world who have that much proficiency and I seriously doubt 95% of the people who answered 5+ are "proficient" in more than 2-3.

That being said, it's no surprise that more than half the site is bilingual or trilingual, assuming that this site has a fairly proportional representation of people from around the world who are decent at English as well as their regional language(s).

Native English tend to be monolingual too, and only a quarter of Canadians have French as their mother tongue, so whoever wrote the first choice is biased. =P

I have a totally different question, though: if you are proficient in Latin, it is highly unlikely that you speak it well, because Latin is not the language of any particular community or culture.Does that mean you can never be proficient in Latin, because you have no good way of testing the full 'range' of proficiency?

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» geowrian on April 28th, 2012, 3:45am

I'm going with (b) for most of it. Of coarse (a) and (c) will be in there too, but I think there's a lot of people who either didn't notice the word "proficiently" or think knowing how to make a simple sentence qualifies as proficient. I took 4 years of Spanish and aced it, but even that's hard to qualify. I can make and understand decently complex sentences, I know the grammar decently, I know a fair amount of vocabulary, and I can understand a native speaker talking. That said, it's debatable if that's really "proficient".

As for Latin, there are still many places that use Latin. If you are Orthodox Roman Catholic, or know somebody in the clergy who is, they probably speak it fluently. I think Russian Orthodox has also returned to Latin masses. Either way, I think there's enough places and people still using Latin daily to get a "full range".

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» Unknown on April 28th, 2012, 4:23am

Post Deleted

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» Fuuchuu on April 28th, 2012, 3:10am

Proficiently I'd say English, German and Vietnamese. I have basic knowledge of French and Japanese, meaning I've had four years of French at school and went to a Japanese class for about one year. Though those were like ten years ago, so sadly not much has remained.

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» emuska on April 28th, 2012, 3:33am

I'm from Finland, so I speak swedish as second official language, english fluently and also french and german.

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» yuno19 on April 28th, 2012, 4:13am

not so different from me, I missed the bragging opportunity. cry

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» Firawai on April 28th, 2012, 6:10am

Ha, I'm from Finland too but my "proficiently" known languages are limited to two. Those six years studying Swedish were wasted on me and just bothered my process of learning the languages I wanted to learn.

So, I'd say that, I know my English and Finnish well, I'm a beginner in Korean and French and I may or may not know "the second official language" - but because I foster negative feelings for it, I won't speak it. embarrassed

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» pyonk on April 28th, 2012, 4:26am

Does Local Language count? There are over 300 local language in my country. Living here for almost 2 decade, I can say I'm quite proficient in 4 local language :/

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» mu2020 on April 28th, 2012, 4:29am

proficiently mean understanding it at a relatively high level right?
i got three. my ethnic language, my country national language (yes. they are different), and english.

Quote
typical meaning would be that you can more or less read, speak, and listen to stuff in that language

if i can read, pronounce and listen to a language but still need an already existing translation to understand it, would that count? i can understand few simple lines, some words and so on, but still not enough fr me to have a conversation using the language
if so then i should choose four.

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» morphin007 on April 28th, 2012, 4:34am

I'm sad that in this poll if you know only one or two language you have no option if you don't know english proficiently.

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» takeva on April 28th, 2012, 4:37am

What happened to knowing two languages without being the rest of the worldconfused Well I know two and I'm American..? LOL second pick is confusing. bigrazz

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» connerity on April 28th, 2012, 4:46am

Proficient: german, english
Fluent: french
Enough to get the meaning behind texts, but by far not fluent: spanish
Learning: japanese

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» Ibleda on April 28th, 2012, 5:08am

Chinese, English, Japanese - from animes and mangas biggrin. Somewhat Taiwanese, since I grew up outside Taiwan, my Taiwanese is absolutely terrible. Got told once mine was like a French speaking them so yea... my mouth has been sealed from then on lol.

I counted Japanese since I can somewhat read kanji, and pretty much hiragana as well. Seeing as Chinese is my mother language, kanji... well actually, I take the kanji, read it in chinese, translate it to english, translate it to japanese. I suppose that's it? XD. And thus I know Japanese~~ laugh

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» myrt on April 28th, 2012, 5:19am

Basically, I'm definitely fluent in Chinese and English - reading, writing, speaking, listening...

I think I'm proficient enough in French - To a certain extent, I can read, write and listen. But my pronunciation is horrific. Let's say, I can almost get by on a French site without google translate/other dictionary... And I know my grammar.

I know how to read a lot of kanji (in the Japanese way), but I don't know Japanese well enough (I know almost nothing about the katakana and hiragana...) Therefore, I'm definitely not proficient in Japanese. I can speak some Maori (NZ official language) but I'm not proficient enough either...

Therefore, 'three' gets my vote. :/

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» So-chan on April 28th, 2012, 5:25am

I am above average biggrin

I've been speaking English, Filipino and this "native" language that I have from the moment I can talk properly laugh self taught and mastered eyes

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» TheGirlWhoDidThat on April 28th, 2012, 5:41am

Well, I'm American, and English is my first language, but since I've been taking spanish since second grade and consider myself proficient enough, I picked choice two. But one of my best friends, also American, speaks English, Spanish, and French fluently and is half-fluent/learning Italian. It's funny because the teachers in the language department think she's the best thing ever, and the math and science department teachers think she's retarded. laugh

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» cheesecakes on April 28th, 2012, 5:55am

In order of proficiency

English
Tagalog (my mother tongue)
Italian (studied in high school)
German (studying in university)

Planning to add Japanese to that list through self study! I would've taken it as an elective but I know I'd completely both up speaking ^^;

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» chris_kotone on April 28th, 2012, 6:26am

I'm Indonesian, it's a country from south-east Asia.
For my daily language, I use Indonesian of course. English is the second language in my life So, sorry if there's some grammar error -_-"
Now, I'm learning Japanese although it's a bit hard none

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» zaykashakh on April 28th, 2012, 6:46am

I'm Russian, that's my native language. I think I can speak English proficiently. And now I'm learning Deutsch.

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» megan-me12 on April 28th, 2012, 6:58am

english, arabic, swedish, spanish and french! bigrazz

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» ashi on April 28th, 2012, 7:10am

Of course, people reading manga are interested in other cultures, so it is really interesting to see that they, consequently, get interested in learning other languages.
I'm guessing that most people who answered (a) and (b) are also trying to learn another language, but are honestly not proficient enough yet to answer the following option.
And how cool it is to see that many are self-taught (nice!) and from countries were the chances of practicing another language are next to nothing (double nice!!)
Personally, Spanish (native), English (university) and German (because I like languages). But I'm starting with Japanese, so that in like.. 6 more years? I can help scanlate biggrin

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» NoOneSpecial75 on April 28th, 2012, 7:14am

While I think this is a cool poll idea, I'm a little offended by the America bashing.

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» tactics on April 28th, 2012, 7:24am

I seem to have a problem when it comes to learning languages.
I basically suck. No matter how hard I try, I can't do it.

So really, English is the only one I really know. I sort of know Greek, but I'm shit at it.
I'm not American either by the way.

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» Nyajinsky on April 28th, 2012, 7:29am

wow, am I smart or is the three languages=above average a bit too much? I thought three is average or less than average. But well.... if I count my native language, I would have three (German and English), but I know japanese (basic grammar and about 500 kanji) and I'm learning swedish at school. I voted for four.

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» senka on April 28th, 2012, 7:34am

I speak four languages: my mother tongue, Swedish (lived there for 8 years), German (live here for 12 years) and of course English smile

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» Alexis_SD on April 28th, 2012, 7:51am

Wow, the bragging topic. I voted three, for those are the languages I can read absolutely anything up to and including scientific literature in - my native tongue, English and Russian. I can make a decent conversation in Japanese, German and Spanish and I've studied some Latin, but I can only recite certain words and phrases, so I'm no good at it.

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» Dragonfiremule on April 28th, 2012, 7:55am

I know 3. English, Spanish, and American Sign Language. ASL feels like a bit of a cheat though, since they don't have a separate written language from English.

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» yui-kun on April 28th, 2012, 7:59am

I'm currently learning Spanish (which would be my third language if I ever will be proficient at it) and I find it a bit difficult. I guess being in my late 20's also makes it more challenging (heh). On the upside, I'm more serious than when I was younger so I somehow make up for it with more effort.

I answered two, btw.

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» AceBunneh on April 28th, 2012, 8:11am

I feel as if I should be offended by the American remark... >.>;; Edit: (But I'm not really..)

Any who, I know English and Chinese. I learned Spanish but since I haven't used it in quite some time I don't remember enough so I answered with "English and..." meaning 2...

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» luminousbrink on April 28th, 2012, 8:42am

so only about 17% of people here know just english? that number should be slightly higher, right? because I'm one of the ones who just knows english proficiently, although i would love to eventually learn many other languages.

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» Rafs on April 28th, 2012, 9:27am

4 languages eyes
polish, english, russian and lithuanian. I can understand and even speak little bit in ukrainian and belarusian ( But it's very similiar to russian so it's doesn't count). I thinking abuot learning french and german languages smile wink grin but I think it will be little to much.

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» elementalblood on April 28th, 2012, 9:31am

Well, I'm Canadian and it's compulsory to take French in school from grade 4. I'm almost completely bilingual (which is nice when travelling to Quebec.) Though I'd like to add Mandarin, Japanese, Italian and Spanish to my list. Though since I know French, Italian and Spanish should be relatively easy to learn since they're all based off Latin. smile I'm taking Japanese in university next year and one of my cousins is teaching me Spanish so we'll see how that turns out >.>

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» julia36 on April 28th, 2012, 10:03am

Wow this thread is just made for the most self-aggrandizing people here, huh? Didn't know there were so many braggarts around. Also, for some people, I doubt they know as many as they claim. Being proficient means being able to get by in the country that speaks said language. Not just being literate in it or knowing a few phrases, or what have you. Also, there's a bit of American bashing in the poll, too. Why not just list the options instead of adding the commentary in the parentheses?

But to answer the poll question, I could say I know three languages. However, I only PROFICIENTLY know one, English.

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» LilyRemains on April 28th, 2012, 10:15am

4 languages.
Finnish(I'm from Finland..yay!),Swedish,German,English (studied all those in school for 5years or more) and been learning Japanese for 4years now. I still got lot to learn but i'm getting better at that too. and I know a little bit of Estonian and Spanish. I like learning languages..it's fun. smile

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» Ren-tan on April 28th, 2012, 10:26am

I'm French and I speak... french, and proficiently english. I'm litterate in Spanish but I can't understand oral properly.

In France you are obliged to learn a 2d language (most of the time, either spanish or german) starting from 8th grade. I don't know why the hell the french National Education decided to force us to do this, since French people can barely understand English properly and are known to have the worst level of foreign language in Europe.... xD

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» monika on April 28th, 2012, 10:29am

I have 2 native languages: Hungarian and Romanian. I currently live in England so English is my third proficient one. Studied Spanish in university and studied one year there, which is my fourth. Learned German for 10 years during my school years. Also studied bit of Japanese in uni, but I'm not proficient in that. I find it difficult though sometimes to switch from a language to the other.

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» NightSwan on April 28th, 2012, 10:41am

I read, write and speak in Russian, Hebrew and English (yes, simultaneously ;p).
And that's it.

It seems to me that this thread has somehow turned into a penis measuring contest.

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» giinko on April 28th, 2012, 4:33pm

Quote from NightSwan
It seems to me that this thread has somehow turned into a penis measuring contest.


You seem to forget the other half of the population.

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» mattai on April 28th, 2012, 4:39pm

Quote from giinko
You seem to forget the other half of the population.


The half that doesn't understand metaphors?

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» giinko on April 28th, 2012, 4:50pm

Quote from mattai
The half that doesn't understand metaphors?


Don't you think it's unfair that metaphor has to be something involving that half and not everybody?

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» Crenshinibon on April 28th, 2012, 4:54pm

Quote from giinko
Don't you think it's unfair that metaphor has to be something involving that half and not everybody?


As with the phrase 'like a moth to a candle,' which is clearly unfair to all those not of a lepidopteran persuasion.

(admittedly this is a simile, but we'll let that bit go.)

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» giinko on April 28th, 2012, 4:59pm

Quote from Crenshinibon
As with the phrase 'like a moth to a candle,' which is clearly unfair to all those not of a lepidopteran persuasion.

(admittedly this is a simile, but we'll let that bit go.)


XD, sorry. I'm half-drunk, haven't sleep for 2 days, and still have to stay up to wait for the last part of the report from the group. A bit cracked, never mind what I've been blabbing.

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» kaerfehtdeelb on April 28th, 2012, 4:54pm

Quote from giinko
Don't you think it's unfair that metaphor has to be something involving that half and not everybody?

how would a vagina measuring contest work?

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» Pebble_ on April 28th, 2012, 5:01pm

Quote from kaerfehtdeelb
how would a vagina measuring contest work?


Easy. But better fit in the 18+ forums, so I'll leave it to your imagination.

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» story645 on April 28th, 2012, 7:04pm

Me too, except my Hebrew is limited to biblical Hebrew and reading food labels and the like, so I don't consider myself proficient. I get the simultaneous thing, even if you're mentioning it as a joke, 'cause I've had conversations with my cousins that flowed in and out of all three languages.

This poll was destined to turn into a contest just by the subject nature. The threads for languages are similar.

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» forror on April 28th, 2012, 10:57am

Like the rest of the world...

1. English
2. Chinese (Cantonese + Mandarin)

I can get by with a bit of French and my Vietnamese listening skills are perfectly fine, but tell me to read/write/speak the language and I'd be screwed. A distant relative called the other day, but since I don't speak a word of Vietnamese and she doesn't understand English, we were just conversing in "um's" and "ah's." It was rather sad when she finally hung up, seeing as I understood every single thing she said.

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» Zina on April 28th, 2012, 12:24pm

I took 6 years of French immersion. My grammar is pretty terrible, but I can read it quite well, and people can understand what I mean when I speak. I can also hold a decent conversation in it.

While I wouldn't take a job in French, I would take one where French would be used sometimes. So I figure that is proficient enough for me to pick "English and..."

Oh, and I'm Canadian, for those interested.

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» Badkarma on April 28th, 2012, 1:25pm

I pretend I know English and Spanish, but I'm proficient in neither.

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» Milleniummaster18 on April 28th, 2012, 2:04pm

I know English and Spanish well enough, matey.

I'm in the process of learning Japanese, yet I can't do anything too fancy with it.

Those comments alongside each option don't really spice up the poll, yet they can irritate some people.
They're on you Lamb, since you chose to include them.

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» mirahsan2 on April 28th, 2012, 2:28pm

I know someone who knows 6! Approaching Hayate the Combat Butler Heroine's (female hero, characters) status!

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» redlinks on April 28th, 2012, 2:36pm

I know English (mother tongue) and I'm in my 5th year of learning Japanese. I studied for 2 years in college and the other 3 years as self taught. I know enough vocab to read some manga and 1st grade novels.

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» Vis1398 on April 28th, 2012, 3:25pm

I know English, French, Italian, German and my mothertongue albanian

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» Pikapu on April 28th, 2012, 3:53pm

Quote from Vis1398
I know English, French, Italian, German and my mothertongue albanian

Albanian, huh... That's neat. *~*

Quote from NightSwan
It seems to me that this thread has somehow turned into a penis measuring contest.

... Agreed. laugh

I am...

Fluent in English, know some Vietnamese, learning Japanese, and know random Spanish (Mis pantalones estan en tu suelo..... among other things).

But I answered "Just English" to be on the safe side..... Lol~

Love,
Pika.

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» ImaginaryWishes on April 28th, 2012, 3:53pm

I can speak French & English. I can speak Korean as well, but my grammar still isn't perfect. smile

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» icarusbride on April 28th, 2012, 3:58pm

Way to be stereotypical and insulting.
I'm American and have studied 8 languages.

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» connerity on April 28th, 2012, 4:00pm

And that allows you to deny that the majority only speaks english?

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» SilverStorm on April 28th, 2012, 6:39pm

Rude is still rude, even if there's some fact to it.

icarus never implied that it's untrue, but rather that the poll is an overgeneralization. (Although, I legitimately would be interested in world statistics on monolingualism and multilingualism...)

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» kingbui on May 1st, 2012, 5:05pm

I don't know about the school districts in other parts of America, but where I'm from, foreign language is required. After three years of Spanish I'd say I'm about as proficient as a native speaking child which was good enough to travel through Mexico.

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» thebopper on May 1st, 2012, 5:35pm

Quote from kingbui
I don't know about the school districts in other parts of America, but where I'm from, foreign language is required. After three years of Spanish I'd say I'm about as proficient as a native speaking child which was good enough to travel through Mexico.


Yes, most states in America require at least two years of a given foreign language in order to qualify for admittance to university.

Depends on what state you live in. For example, my state, Florida, requires the two years only as a university requirement, but not as a compulsory subject needed to graduate high school.

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» mikako17 on May 2nd, 2012, 7:24pm

Quote from thebopper
Yes, most states in America require at least two years of a given foreign language in order to qualify for admittance to university.

Depends on what state you live in. For example, my state, Florida, requires the two years only as a university requirement, but not as a compulsory subject needed t ...


Yep, Minnesota (where I grew up, though now I'm at college and am far away smile) requires at least one year of a foreign language to graduate high school. I believe that most high school students who go on to higher education have at least one year of a foreign language. Ah, stereotypes, though I bet it was true a decade or so ago that most Americans didn't know another language. Anyway, I'm happy to say I know four! XD Though I am not a Modern Languages major, I do know English, Hmong, French, and Japanese.

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» Maxieflame on May 2nd, 2012, 7:36pm

Spanish and English.

Quote from mikako17
I believe that most high school students who go on to higher education have at least one year of a foreign language.


From what I noticed in the US most high school students just take the easy route and try Spanish but end up forgetting a lot of it afterwards. Which can be due to various reasons.

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» Crenshinibon on May 2nd, 2012, 7:45pm

Quote from mikako17
Yep, Minnesota (where I grew up, though now I'm at college and am far away smile ) requires at least one year of a foreign language to graduate high school. I believe that most high school students who go on to higher education have at least one year of a foreign language. Ah, stereotypes, though I ...


Except one year of a foreign language isn't going to get you anywhere close to proficiency. It's just a cursory knowledge that either ends up useless or forgotten. One year is barely better than none, especially when it comes to apathetic high school students.

Countries that integrate mandatory foreign language study from an early age and continue it throughout schooling produce considerably more multilingual citizens. The US does not. It's not a stereotype, it's a statistical fact.

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» mikako17 on May 4th, 2012, 5:36pm

Quote from Crenshinibon
It's not a stereotype, it's a statistical fact


The stereotype I'm referring to is that Americans don't know any other language other than English and that is not a fact since there are many Americans who know two languages.

Though I do agree that one year of another language is not enough, but I do know there are elementary schools, public elementary schools, that are foreign language immersion schools. So there is an effort now in the US to have foreign language study from an early age. I was just saying that it's changing and the stereotype doesn't apply as much now.

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» BlackBlaze on May 4th, 2012, 6:36pm

Quote from mikako17
The stereotype I'm referring to is that Americans don't know any other language other than English and that is not a fact since there are many Americans who know two languages.

Though I do agree that one year of another language is not enough, but I do know there are elementary schools, public e ...



She/he is quite correct I took Spanish back in elementary for 6 years
Incoming High schooler have to take two years of a foreign language to be able to graduate
So as she/he said it doesn't apply as much anymore

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» gwkimmy on May 4th, 2012, 10:48pm

though it really depends on region -_- in some places the government is abolishing cultural studies of any kind because its UN-AMERICAN OMG. naturally language requirement is next to nothing.

although there are plenty of school with language immersion nowadays, i'd say it's still a trend that isn't quite catching on yet ;( freaking government and their shrinking education budgets @_@

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» JakeeDylan on April 28th, 2012, 5:34pm

English... that's all.
I took Spanish since 6th grade, but I consider myself unable to speak or understand nearly the entire language. So... yeah.

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» drunkguy on April 28th, 2012, 6:53pm

English. I've taken classes in a number of other languages but I wouldn't call myself proficient in them.

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» doki-doki-kimochi on April 28th, 2012, 8:16pm

Slightly offended by the American remark ._. but only because I was born and raised here. I have no other sentimental attachments to America except for this.

But seriously...I would expect that most Americans would pick choice two...considering that it's a 'melting pot' and so diverse and all, but whatever. I'm guessing most of the population don't even have much of a cultural background anyways, unless you count the people who say they're 1/4 Irish, 1/4 Scottish...

As for me, it's two, which disappoints me greatly...but hey, I guess I can always change that, right? smile

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» Badkarma on April 28th, 2012, 8:57pm

Sure, sure... but when you think about it, "American" is actually pretty vague terminology. North American? Latin American?

Now I'm confused.

Seems the poll maker lacks the English proficiency to write a coherent, politically correct jab.

Ohhhhhh, we all know he meant U.S. citizens, but let's be ignorant if it helps us sleep at night, yes?

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» lambchopsil on April 29th, 2012, 1:48am

Quote from Badkarma
Seems the poll maker lacks the English proficiency to write a coherent, politically correct jab.

Ohhhhhh, we all know he meant U.S. citizens, but let's be ignorant if it helps us sleep at night, yes?

If you only know English, there's a good chance you're from the US. That's all the first choice implies.

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» Crenshinibon on April 29th, 2012, 9:23am

Quote from Badkarma
Sure, sure... but when you think about it, "American[/url]" is actually pretty vague terminology. North American? Latin American?

Now I'm confused.

Seems the poll maker lacks the English proficiency to write a coherent, politically correct jab.

Ohhhhhh, we all know he meant U.S. citizens, but l ...


Don't forget your [homeland] security blanket!

On topic: I know two (English, Japanese) well enough to actually be certified as 'proficient,' and if I hadn't spent a couple years in Japan, I probably wouldn't even be able to claim two. I'm always working on more, but beyond a third or fourth grade level I quickly become quite useless.

Let's be honest, guys. Studying a language alone does not make one proficient. I know a guy who studied Japanese for a good five years and is still utterly useless in actual conversation. He's not even much of an anomaly. I used to see that all the time with random foreigners. It's just that practical usage often requires a totally different skillset from what you learn in a classroom. You need a combination of education and practical application for proficiency, so please excuse me while I scoff at anyone in this thread that uses 'studied' as a barometer for their abilities. It's a very poor indicator.

On the US: The vast majority does only speak one language. Our school system doesn't support anything else, and an alarming number of voters seem to think that foreign language education is a waste (that same subset tends to fail to comprehend the notion of globalization and the economic interconnections it creates, but that's an overly politicized rant for another time). It's a part of the culture; don't be insulted when the statistics suggest that to be the case. Take pride if you are honestly able to proficiently function entirely in another language, though not if you've only dabbled- again, that doesn't count and you shouldn't pretend it does.

The exception tends to be the second generation of immigrant families. By the third generation, things are often homogenized down to English again.

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» forgottenone666 on April 28th, 2012, 9:19pm

Quote from doki-doki-kimochi
But seriously...I would expect that most Americans would pick choice two...considering that it's a 'melting pot' and so diverse and all, but whatever. I'm guessing most of the population don't even have much of a cultural background anyways, unless you count the people who say they're 1/4 Irish, 1/4 Scottish...


Yeah I mean as an American I have some German and Native American blood running through my veins but when you get down to it I'm just your average white-boy. I never had any attachments to my heritage thus I never had a need to learn those languages.

As far as language goes I only know English proficiently.

proficient:

noun:An expert; an adept.

I'm certain 95% of the people in the world can't truthfully claim to be proficient in another language than the one they grew up using.

As far as Americans only knowing English for the most part.

Consider these points:

It is our main language.

Most other countries may have a high population that knows two languages but it is only because they have their main language and they usually learn English as a second language because it is deemed the most important language to know from a business standpoint.

They might also learn another language based on the fact that they are surrounded by many countries that use other languages as their main language(European and Asian countries are surrounded by many diverse countries thus they would probably learn some of each others languages)

Americans don't pursue another language diligently because most of us already know English and that is what most of the world uses from a business standpoint. It would only make sense for us to teach our kids Spanish since we have a high population of Spanish speaking residents or Chinese as from a business standpoint they are a fast growing market and we do a lot of business with the Chinese.

So from an educational standpoint it doesn't make much sense to make our kids learn a different language if there really isn't a need to. We are required to take language courses(I took Spanish) but it isn't something that is important from a career or societal standpoint so most of us don't pursue it diligently. (Meaning I don't really remember too much of the Spanish I learned)

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» gwkimmy on May 3rd, 2012, 7:31am

however, studies show that children taught another language from a young age show more brain development and generally do better in school than their monolingual peers. doesn't matter if they end up using the language or not, it's good education.

also, considering that the US is approaching "melting pot" status (in certain areas at least), why not? jobs that deal with the public a lot (even low level retail) always jump at the chance to hire a multilingual person.

i know english and spanish fluently. biggrin

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» uzumakiwalid on April 28th, 2012, 8:54pm

I'm from Indonesia so my native language are indonesian and here english were taught as second language, i have a basic japanese knowledge so really can't say i'm proficient at japanese, though i'm know enough english enough to be called proficient at it(at english i mean, in any case anyone wondering)

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» Myuym on April 29th, 2012, 2:37am

Interesting poll, it's just not really about manga...

And as there was some sort of definition given in the first post, why whine about the correct use of "proficiently"? (though independent user might have been better)

Anyway, Dutch native speaker C2 Everything
English, Second language, C1 (exept for listening and reading C2)
German, Mostly, B2 some B1 (hoping to study in Heidelberg next year to increase this)
French, Mostly A1(A few years of classes in highschool)

Anyway, want to know how good you really are, just look at this table where one can find out how good one is.

-I chose three languages-

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» Nirhtuc on April 29th, 2012, 5:34am

It's not just Americans that only know English- what about New Zealand, Australia, and England? I won't say Canada since there appears to be many bilinguals (with French as L1 or L2) there.

Not to mention, all the monolingual asian countries like Japan and China, where many people can sort of read/write English, but are not necessarily proficient, hence being monolingual with a non-English language as L1, which is not accomodated for in the current poll.

I'm an Australian of south Asian ancestry, but English has become my first language, since it's the only langauge I can read, write, and speak proficiently. I can manage my 'native' language at conversation level, but my reading and writing are at the level of a 7 to 8 year old, apparently! laugh

Interesting poll again, this week! smile

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» ebisu on April 29th, 2012, 6:02am

In this self-bragging poll I agree above average should be the four language option, because in some places they have two languages from the place plus english.
And about the question, it says "proficiently know" not "proficiently speak" or "to be proficient" so if you only know how to write and read that could be an OK language for the poll, and not a lie.
I can get by in Spanish, Catalan (mother tongues) and English. Studying currently French and German and I know a bit of Japanese (the "I studied for a year in the past" level).
My sure bet would be the three option, but I think my French could be added so I choose four wink

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» negrinat on April 29th, 2012, 1:11pm

Quote from ebisu
I can get by in Spanish, Catalan (mother tongues) and English.


Plus a little of French

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» minna on April 29th, 2012, 6:03am

I'm Finnish so it's mandatory to know at least three languages, Finnish, Swedish and English. I also studied French, German, Spanish and Japanese, but French is the only one of them that I know well enought to read books and magazines.

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» Hekat on April 29th, 2012, 9:44am

French, Dutch, English, German, Italian, Spanish, Japanese, Russian, a bit of Chinese and sign language smile

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» n8starr on April 29th, 2012, 10:56am

I am also american and know two languages fluently, English and Spanish. With that being said I am a language lover! I have studied at one point in time Japanese, Albanian, Italian, Russian and Turkish. I'm currently studying Persian (Farsi). Knowing Spanish, I can get by in reading things in French. My goal is to become proficient in at least one language from every continent (minus Antarctica of course)

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» WandereroftheDeep on April 29th, 2012, 11:12am

Dutch, English, and German; in that order.

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» The Guy on April 29th, 2012, 1:14pm

Quote from WandereroftheDeep
Dutch, English, and German; in that order.


For me it's English, Dutch and German, in that order strangely enough.
Too much English TV as a kid. biggrin

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» E.n.i.g.m.a. on April 29th, 2012, 3:41pm

Proficient in my dialect (not sure if that counts), my country's language, and English.

3 years of French. Can converse with locals with no problem, but I wouldn't say proficient yet. I'm on my way there, though, in a few years! biggrin

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» Booktan on April 29th, 2012, 4:56pm

Four.
I can read and write English fluently, I can read and write Finnish fluently, I can listen and read Swedish but I cannot talk it (Like small children, I understand what they are saying but I have no idea how to reply.)
And to top it all off with the best one.. I can speak Japanese and read it!
Also studying French but I am dumping it as I have no interest in it after trying it out. ^^

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» Kurru on April 29th, 2012, 5:48pm

Only 1. English. But I'm from the UK were we typically only speak English. But we're not american you insensitive clods! bigrazz

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» sweet_basil on April 30th, 2012, 1:02am

I know Turkish, English, Japanese and am learning Korean and Tagalog (Filipino)
But here in the Philippines knowing 4 languages is just normal, because there are many tribes and all of them talk in a different language; not dialect but real different language.
I can't imagine them learning extra languages, really approaching godly statuses.. bigrazz

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» randomreader on April 30th, 2012, 2:00am

you should make a note to all the weeaboo's that a couple halfassed japanese words and kanji you picked up watching too much anime does NOT constitute knowing a second language

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» CuthienSilmeriel on April 30th, 2012, 3:26am

By your definition - 2. I'm fluent in English (being English and all), and apparently know Japanese as I can read, write, and have conversations in it. However, I only know half of the standard 2000 kanji you need to know, my intonation sucks, and I still need help in day-to-day life sometimes. I consider myself as only being proficient in English really. Living in Japan highlights my shortcomings in the language so I am nowhere near proficient even after 2 years here as I can't handle every situation with ease yet.

Maybe understanding should be included in the definition. I can read French and Spanish, but I don't understand either, lol. I failed both at school since I was too busy trying to learn Elvish being the LotR geek that I was/am. I've forgotten all my elvish, as Viggo Mortensen or Orlando Bloom weren't available to practice on.

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» Turbophoenix on May 1st, 2012, 7:20am

Protip - There are English-speaking countries outside of the US -_-

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» ajmanga on May 1st, 2012, 11:21am

Yeah but usually they speak a second language.

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» xXanjaXx on May 1st, 2012, 7:43am

mother tounge: german

english, frensh (but i have a bad mark in school shy ) ^^

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» Silent Howl on May 1st, 2012, 7:48am

french is my language of everyday...

speak english, and learning rusian...

plan to learn japanese too..but I don't know when i will start...

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» ajmanga on May 1st, 2012, 11:21am

I agree with these comments. There are quite a few people in America who know two languages. Just because you're American doesn't mean you know only English.
But the fact is...most of them weren't originally American. But the children are and sometimes our parents teach us their native languages (sometimes...).
Living where I do, many people know English and Spanish. I'd say at least 50%, but I'd bet it's higher than that.

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» Rouzmary on May 1st, 2012, 11:53am

ok so...(so far i'm the only one from Latvia or around here huh? not undexpected but still kind of sad...)

ok, my mothertongue - Latvian smile

English - might as well call it second mothertongue but obviously not that good but still, very proficient i'd say bigrazz

German - been learning for past 3 years, not bad, as long as i dont have to listen to those tapes, they're horrible, in real life, movies or songs i can understand what they're saying but not those horrible tapes ugh dead

French - also past 3 years and the same with tapes, but when i went to France this spring, we actually understood each other, yay laugh

Russian - can't help knowing it seeing how we were under Soviet Union for so long and nearly half of our population is still remnants of those times & they're our big neighbour, but oh well, its good to know languages roll

Japanese - it most definitely can not be included in the "proficient" part but as long as it's only speaking or listening i guess i can get by cool

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» eLfu on May 1st, 2012, 11:57am

I know five 'living' languages, and one 'dead'.

I can speak English, French and Dutch rather fluently (I think).
(And I should: all the people in the north of my country are supposed to know these languages, since few people speak Dutch)

My German is average and my Spanish slightly below average (I can understand everything they say, but my answers are rather clumsy).
I can read Latin ('though I don't know if dead languages count), but I only know the basics of Ancient Greek

Next year I'm going to study Japanese.

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» Mara618 on May 1st, 2012, 12:38pm

I feel so ignorant! I only know two! Just English and Spanish for me. It's kind of a stretch, but I can read Portuguese pretty well since it's so close to Spanish, but I don't think that counts

But, I am American, so I think I'm doing alright by being bilingual smile wink grin

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» thebopper on May 1st, 2012, 12:54pm

My native tongue is English., since I'm a born and raised American.

I also know a fair degree of German, because of my heritage, since I've took a few years of it back in high school, but nowhere near proficient / fluent. I can probably engage in a small chat or recognize a song, but not enough to live it 24 / 7.

I also taught myself the Cyrillic alphabet and Hangul, but I've never found the time nor urge to learn those languages.

What's the deal with those two English options? I kinda feel pissed off about it, because it somewhat insults my intelligence because I'm an American, and it plays into some stereotypes that some people like to portray us Americans as stupid, uncultured, and self-caring people.

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» israel8491 on May 1st, 2012, 6:23pm

2 - English and modern Hebrew. I used to know some Spanish, but I've forgotten it since I started taking Hebrew. I can read, speak, and write in both print and cursive Hebrew. I can read and understand Biblical Hebrew, but since the conjugations are so different I can't speak it (example: past tense in Biblical Hebrew somehow became future tense in moder Hebrew... not quite sure how).

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» Ame_Sama on May 2nd, 2012, 11:54am

Hebrew, English, Russian and Juhuri language. I also can understand Japanese in most cases.

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» vivogram on May 2nd, 2012, 7:38pm

English is my first language. My mother tongue is another. My parents use 3 other languages with me (when I was younger). I can watch movies spoken in any of those languages and understand 100% of them, but I can't read, write or speak proficiently in those other languages (other than English).

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» crossyuuki on May 2nd, 2012, 7:42pm

I can read, speak, write, and understand Tagalog and English proficiently. Currently taking my second year of Spanish smile

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» mangafan321 on May 4th, 2012, 9:22pm

being an american doesnt mean you only speak one language. i was born in america, but my parents are cuban, so i speak english and spanish. america is a melting pot of different people. but i dont think that makes me less of an american. just saying. lol

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» Damnedman on May 4th, 2012, 10:13pm

Quote from mangafan321
being an american doesnt mean you only speak one language. i was born in america, but my parents are cuban, so i speak english and spanish. america is a melting pot of different people. but i dont think that makes me less of an american. just saying. lol

The comments are just jokes bigrazz read the entire post. He's just playing on the stereotype that americans only care about themselves.

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» ookamisama on May 5th, 2012, 12:04pm

I speak proficiently/fluently 3-4 languages, mostly romance languages. Spanish (native language), English (fluent & mostly used), Italian and Portuguese. I can somewhat understand other languages, but only these I know fluently.

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» YumeHira on May 9th, 2012, 6:19am

English is my 2nd language. Aaand, i know basic japanese and other asian languages like chinese,korean,etc.
As for now i'm studying dutch as one of classes that i take.

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» jasperv on September 23rd, 2012, 4:22am

my mother tong is an Arabic dialect (Algerian) it too different from classical arabic that Middle easterns can't understand our dialect
and my second is classical Arabic of course
third is French (20years speaking and reading)
and fourth is English 10years reading/writing and Hearing as opposed to speaking
cause i don't have anyone to speak English with (there is less English-speakers in Algeria because Its a half Francophone country
I was trying to learn Japanese but didn't have any success and motivation alway goes down
French was in school curriculum and in University/College you had to learn only in french
English was thought starting in 2year of Highschool but not mandatory for studies
but in my field (IT) its a must or else you'll be left behind by new IT technologies
so it was do or die but is there any use of learning Japanese other than reading raws?

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