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Manga Poll
What kind of humor do you think you most develop after reading your usual manga?
Awkward
Serious or Dark
Cute
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Sarcastic or Ironic
Witty
Perverted
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Friendly
None at all
 
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News Article
New Poll - Native Language
This week's poll was suggested by 狂気. You may not like how some languages are included in families while others are individual, but deal with it. Well, we ARE an English site...

You can submit poll ideas here (and try to keep them manga/anime-related)
http://www.mangaupdates.com/showtopic.php?tid=3903

Previous Poll Results:
Question: How big of a manga fan are you (in terms of # of series read / reading)?
Choices:
Beginner (<10) - votes: 213 (1.9%)
Casual reader (10-100) - votes: 1809 (15.8%)
Rookie (100-250) - votes: 1831 (16%)
Intermediate amateur (250-500) - votes: 2142 (18.7%)
Amateur (500-750) - votes: 1345 (11.7%)
Advanced amateur (750-1k) - votes: 1340 (11.7%)
Intermediate professional (1-1.5k) - votes: 996 (8.7%)
Professional (1.5k-2k) - votes: 560 (4.9%)
Advanced professional (2k-3k) - votes: 298 (2.6%)
Sensei (3k+) - votes: 930 (8.1%)
There were 11464 total votes.
The poll ended: August 22nd 2014

Pretty good bell curve except for the sensei option. 3k is a lot...
Posted by lambchopsil on August 23rd 5:36am Comments ( 37 )  [ View ]  [ Add ]
Comments

» darkraiders on August 22nd, 2014, 10:42pm

Kinda obvious english will get the highest % here, but for it's french.

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» Topomouse on August 23rd, 2014, 12:49am

I find it kind of funny that you managed to include most European languages, either in families or individually, but being Italian I still had to vote "others". biggrin

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» Natsuki@ on August 23rd, 2014, 12:54am

wow the dutch language is even mentioned ;p oh well it makes it easier to click for me smile

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» phae2y on August 23rd, 2014, 1:32am

Malayo-Polynesian here, or specifically: Bahasa Malaysia.

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» RoxFlowz on August 23rd, 2014, 2:12am

German here, will be interesting to see the final results of this poll eyes

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» Aijin-of-Iwa on August 23rd, 2014, 2:46am

Catalan is my native language.

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» sudsong on August 24th, 2014, 10:06am

How is Catalan different from Spanish? Can you communicate with Spanish with Catalan?

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» zarlan on August 24th, 2014, 4:56pm

Quote from sudsong
How is Catalan different from Spanish? Can you communicate with Spanish with Catalan?

It is arguably not even in the same language family, apparently. *just looked it up*

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» Sylar on August 27th, 2014, 5:10am

Both languages belong to the same family (Latin languages) but no, they are not the same. It looks like a mix of French and Spanish (and also Italian i think) but it's really a language on its own, not a dialect of Spanish/French.

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» zarlan on August 27th, 2014, 12:49pm

Quote from Sylar
Both languages belong to the same family (Latin languages) but no, they are not the same. It looks like a mix of French and Spanish (and also Italian i think) but it's really a language on its own, not a dialect of Spanish/French.

Certainly Catalan and Spanish are both Romance languages, and more specifically Western Romance languages, but...
Catalan is either part of the Occitano-Romance languages, or part of the Ibero-Romance languages.

For more info:
Wikipedia - Catalan language#Classification and relationship with other Romance languages

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» Aijin-of-Iwa on August 28th, 2014, 3:28am

Spanish and Catalan aren't the same language, even if they are similar. Depending on the other person's knowledge, you might or might not be able to communicate with a Spanish person using Catalan, but I could also talk to a French person using Catalan and we'd more or less understand each other.
I suggest you go and look up the two languages if you're interested in the differences.

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» tsuto on August 23rd, 2014, 2:59am

Spanish.

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» Trimutius on August 23rd, 2014, 7:02am

I'm Russian, though I moved to Canada when I was 23. I'm pretty surprised that currently Slavic languages are first after English, though might be time difference, lets see results in a week.

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» zarlan on August 23rd, 2014, 9:00am

I voted "other", because...
This poll will work for most people ...but not us who grew up multi-lingually.
To be fair, it would probably get too messy, if you take us into account (an "multiple" option would have been good though).

I have two "native" languages, though I've learned three languages, as "First Languages" (as opposed to ones you learn as a Second Language).
Kurdish (Indo-Persian. Closely related to Persian) is my mother tongue, Swedish is the language of the country where was born and raised (and where I remain)
...and while I am not a native speaker of English, I learned it as a First Language.
We had a bunch of British TV channels, for some reason, which had plenty of kids shows. I could chat away in English, well before it would count as a Second Language. Heck, I don't know that I couldn't do it, from about as soon as I started to learn how to talk ...just that an appropriate opportunity didn't present itself.

BTW: I get really annoyed by the fact that English kids shows/movies are always dubbed, in non-English speaking countries. People argue "but they can't read" or "but they can't read quickly enough" ...to which I respond "why would they need to read!?". I certainly never had a problem ...and that wasn't because I was unique or special in any way.

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» CheshireCaine on August 23rd, 2014, 9:02am

I was born and live in England, but my native language is Punjabi and more generally (country as opposed to state): Hindi.

EDIT: @zarlan - Good point, I probably should have been paying more attention. Thanks anyway.

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» zarlan on August 23rd, 2014, 9:11am

Quote from CheshireCaine
I was born and live in England, but my native language is Punjabi and more generally (country as opposed to state): Hindi.

In what possible way could the language of the country you were born and raised in, which you learned from birth, not count as your native language?
If you look up the meaning of the terms "native" and "native language"...
If anything, it could be argued that English but not Punjabi, counts as your native language.
Your mother tongue, however...

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» mysstris on August 23rd, 2014, 6:34pm

When i think of native language, it's easier for me to define it as the language that one uses when thinking. That or the default definition is usually something along the lines of "the language of you consider you homeland/nation".

Based on the former, it isn't so confusing to answer this kind of question for people with circumstances like CheshireCaine's or those who "grew up multilingually."

For that reason I chose english but honestly....when I look up the definition of "native langauge"...it could very well have been chinese. I don't know.

Admin want to smack the definition of native language somewhere?

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» Trimutius on August 23rd, 2014, 8:48pm

I can easily think in both English and Russian (not the mix of 2 but rather separately) since I started to immerse into English area pretty early. And even though Russian is my first language and I studies in school and university in Russian, I was coming to Canada for visits quite often (my sister moved here long time before me)
I'm not sure if it is normal but currently I even have dreams in both Russian and English.

I would say, environment in which you were brought up is what matters...

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» zarlan on August 24th, 2014, 7:33am

Quote from Trimutius
I'm not sure if it is normal but currently I even have dreams in both Russian and English.

I generally dream in a mix of my first languages and...
I've had a dream where I spoke with a person in the dream, exclusively in German (which I've learned as a second language).
I can't say for sure how normal it is, but I'd be very surprised if it were not perfectly normal.
In fact, I'd say it would probably be very abnormal, for someone to never dream in a language that they know well. Why would they not?

As to thinking in one language... I think that, that is exclusive to monolingual people (and I'm including people who only know a few words, and possibly are able to ask directions, in another language, in that)

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» zarlan on August 24th, 2014, 7:28am

Quote from mysstris
When i think of native language, it's easier for me to define it as the language that one uses when thinking. That or the default definition is usually something along the lines of "the language of you consider you homeland/nation".

Based on the former, it isn't so confusing to answer this kind of question for people with circumstances like CheshireCaine's or those who "grew up multilingually."

Just because you, personally, only think in one language, doesn't mean that we all do.
I think in a multilingual mix.
Generally a mixture of my three first languages, with the occasional appearance of my two second languages ...meaning that I'd go from two native tongues, to... well should I just count the main three, or all five? I don't think in my mother tongue, as often as my other first languages. Does that mean that I shouldn't count it, despite having learned it from birth, and never having ceased using it?
Not particularly less confusing, quite frankly.
Quite the opposite.

"the language you consider your homeland/nation" is a bit closer to what a native language is, though it's not quite right.
It wouldn't change a thing for me, either way: I'd still have the same two native languages.
Quote
Admin want to smack the definition of native language somewhere?

I'm no admin, but...

Native language:
"One of the more widely accepted definitions of a native speaker is someone who was born in a particular country and was raised to speak the language of that country during the critical period of their development"
-Wikipedia

"One's first language, learned in early childhood."
-Wiktionary

"the language of the country that someone is born in or native to"
-Collins English Dictionary

(actually entry for "Native tongue") "the native language of someone; the language of the country that someone is born in or native to"
Collins English Dictionary


Native (as an adjective):
"Belonging to one by birth."
"Born or grown in the region in which it lives or is found; not foreign or imported."
"Arising by birth; having an origin; born."
"Original; constituting the original substance of anything."
"Naturally related; cognate; connected (with)."
-Wiktionary

"Associated with the place or circumstances of a personís birth"
"(Of a quality) belonging to a personís character from birth; innate"
-Oxford dictionary

"living in a particular country, area, or city since birth"
"native abilities or qualities are those that you have had since birth"
Macmillan Dictionary
Native (as an adjective):
"Belonging to one by birth."
"Born or grown in the region in which it lives or is found; not foreign or imported."
"Arising by birth; having an origin; born."
"Original; constituting the original substance of anything."
"Naturally related; cognate; connected (with)."
-Wiktionary

"Associated with the place or circumstances of a personís birth"
"(Of a quality) belonging to a personís character from birth; innate"
-Oxford dictionary

"living in a particular country, area, or city since birth"
"native abilities or qualities are those that you have had since birth"
Macmillan Dictionary

Some dictionaries give a wider definition, like "language learned in early childhood", which is actually the definition of "first language", but that is merely a lazy/clumsy/ignorant dismissal of what it means for a language to be "native".
A mother tongue, however, is the language(s) of your parents. Of your people(s)/ethnicity/ethnicities.
You can have a person who has, say, Polish as their mother tongue, but who has never learned any Polish, and indeed doesn't know a word of it.

In short:
First language: A language before the age of 6-7, and which is still maintained.
Native language: A language you are born into, and learned from birth (more or less). By nationality and/or residency.
Mother tongue: The language of your parents/blood. No requirement of competence.

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» mysstris on August 27th, 2014, 12:50pm

Fair enough. I've learned something new. People don't think primarily in one language. Thank you for my newly acquired education.

It appears that I should have voted other then based on various posts.

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» zarlan on August 27th, 2014, 1:02pm

Quote from mysstris
People don't think primarily in one language.


Well you do if you're not competent (maybe fluent? Might depend on the person) in more than one language, of course, but otherwise you don't, AFAIK.

Quote
As for the native language definition, it seems to me that I'm not the only one to have answered the poll based on their personal interpretation of what "native language" is.

That is pretty much to be expected.
Unless you first present a clear definition of what is meant by "native language", for the purposes of the poll, you'll get some differing interpretations of the term.
It's not quite perfectly clear, and there are differing opinions. Even with the definitions I've posted, those could be interpreted in significantly different ways. It would, e.g., change which language(s) are my native ones.
I strongly feel that it should be defined one way, but there are not unreasonable arguments that can be made for other interpretations...

Well, the poll does ask "What would you consider to be", so I guess it's kinda appropriate wink

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» Sorex on August 23rd, 2014, 9:21am

This is funny because yesterday I was just watching a video of a guy speaking more than 10 languages on youtube (laoshu50500).

Anyway, my native language is Spanish. My parents are from China, but I was born in Panama (Central America). Before, I could speak Chinese too, but now I've forgotten how to speak it.

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» fracchan on August 23rd, 2014, 10:46am

I had to vote "others" because you have included all the possible European languages but not Italian none Anyway...I'm pretty sure English will be the winner biggrin

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» NightSwan on August 23rd, 2014, 11:49am

Russian is my native language, although since I came to Israel at a pretty young age,
Hebrew is as close to it as it gets.

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» mysstris on August 23rd, 2014, 6:29pm

I guess there is no reason to separate which "english" region. It'd be too tedious.

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» sudsong on August 24th, 2014, 10:09am

I'm Thai.

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» hkanz on August 24th, 2014, 3:04pm

English! Corrupt Canadian English, that is. While in Europe, I was asked whether I could speak English... while I was speaking English. smile

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» Trimutius on August 27th, 2014, 4:25am

Quote from hkanz
English! Corrupt Canadian English, that is. While in Europe, I was asked whether I could speak English... while I was speaking English. smile

Don't speak slang while in non-english speaking country, use something simple in Europe unless you are In Great Britain.

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» hkanz on August 27th, 2014, 12:14pm

Quote from Trimutius
Don't speak slang while in non-english speaking country, use something simple in Europe unless you are In Great Britain.

Yeah, that 's a given. I don't think I was using slang at the time, I think it was an accent thing. Or speed thing - it's easy to forget how fast a normal talking speed can seem when you're speaking to someone who doesn't know the language well.

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» Rafs on August 26th, 2014, 8:57am

Polish here eyes but born and living in Lithuania. I'm really interested how many there are of us(Polish) smile

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» Xeronia on August 26th, 2014, 8:51pm

What do you do if you're natively bilingual? I'm Chinese-American. Although the English is obviously better (even though the Chinese came first), I've been speaking both without much thought most of my life.

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» zarlan on August 27th, 2014, 12:38pm

Quote from Xeronia
What do you do if you're natively bilingual? I'm Chinese-American. Although the English is obviously better (even though the Chinese came first), I've been speaking both without much thought most of my life.

Then they are both your native languages, as far as I'm concerned.
There is no option for that, so I'd suggest answering "other", like I did.

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» sidzero on August 27th, 2014, 10:12am

I voted English. TECHNICALLY it is my native language (having been born and raised in the US and what not), but I'd really like to say that the language I think in is Jibberish, rather than English. If somehow, humans miraculously evolved telepathy overnight, I'd still be pretty safe from having people reading my thoughts, because not a single person on this planet would be able to understand them.

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» Damnedman on August 27th, 2014, 2:06pm

The lack of Chinese on here is surprising. I guess they do have their own sites for Chinese scanlations.

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» dalek on August 28th, 2014, 1:37pm

Portuguese here. I'm glad to see we are 4.3%, I would love to know how much of this percentage speaks brazilian portuguese. roll

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» Cooper on August 30th, 2014, 3:46pm

Quote
Baltic (Latvian, Lithuanian, etc.) - votes: 105 (0.7%)

A whooping 0,7%. Soon we will dominate MU laugh

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