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jj11103
Post #580456 - Reply to (#580455) by chineserider
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7:23 am, Dec 14 2012
Posts: 148


Quote from chineserider
A simile is basically an analogy between two things with the use of "like" or "as."

Thank you(:

neonkitty
Post #580466
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9:12 am, Dec 14 2012
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"Describe the social nature of writing, particularly the role of discourse communities at the local, national, and international level."

Da fuq does that even mean? o_O

chineserider
Post #580470 - Reply to (#580466) by neonkitty
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10:32 am, Dec 14 2012
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This seems helpful.
https://sites.google.com/site/danielepitcher/outcome-d

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jelzin89
Post #580477 - Reply to (#580466) by neonkitty
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12:11 pm, Dec 14 2012
Posts: 270


Quote from neonkitty
"Describe the social nature of writing, particularly the role of discourse communities at the local, national, and international level."

Da fuq does that even mean? o_O


well...for what purpose do you describe something?

writing and culture are interconnected.one social aspect.
writing enables people, communities, states... to interact with each other. especially when they are far apart(geographically). a lot to write about

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WandereroftheDeep
Post #580505 - Reply to (#580456) by jj11103
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8:25 pm, Dec 14 2012
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Quote from jj11103
Quote from chineserider
A simile is basically an analogy between two things with the use of "like" or "as."

Thank you(:


I'm sorry, but a simile is not an analogy between two things with the use of "like" or "as"; a simile is a metaphor which contains "like" or "as". Be careful not to confuse "like" and "as"; "as" can only be used if the first and the second element of the simile refer to the same entity (e.g. "Mary flies as a dove" means Mary is a dove).

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flowinmyboat
Post #580506 - Reply to (#580505) by WandereroftheDeep
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8:56 pm, Dec 14 2012
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Quote from WandereroftheDeep
I'm sorry, but a simile is not an analogy between two things with the use of "like" or "as"; a simile is a metaphor which contains "like" or "as". Be careful not to confuse "like" and "as"; "as" can only be used if the first and the second elem ...


What?? A metaphor and simile are two different things (I've heard the argument that a simile is a type of metaphor before but I don't think it's acknowledged). " Similes states that A is like B, a metaphor states that A is B or substitutes B for A." The point is that A and B are different entities that you are comparing to each other.

"A simile is a figure of speech that directly compares two different things, usually by employing the words "like" or "as" – also, but less commonly, "if", or "than""

ex. busy as a bee (you aren't a bee but as busy as one)
Mary flies like a dove (Human's can't fly but if they could Mary would fly like a dove--i.e. elegently)
They fought like cats and dogs.(They fought aggressively like dogs and cats would--since dogs and cats don't like each other)


Last edited by flowinmyboat at 9:05 pm, Dec 14

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flowinmyboat
Post #580512 - Reply to (#580466) by neonkitty
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9:23 pm, Dec 14 2012
Posts: 65


Quote from neonkitty
"Describe the social nature of writing, particularly the role of discourse communities at the local, national, and international level."

Da fuq does that even mean? o_O


A discourse community is a a group of communicators with a common goal or interest that adopts certain preferred ways of participating in public discussion; you'd usually need membership to these communities and follow their communication norms (businessmen would have their own community, lawyers, politicians, doctors, mechanics, computer programmers etc etc). If you don't follow these norms, you're in risk of being kicked-out or down-talked (commonly seen in politics).

I think it's just saying to describe how writing affects societies (academic papers, books, lectures, debates, TV and radio programming) and how people are viewed in society. For example, how you'd write this assignment vs a text or email. You wouldn't use shorthand or contractions because you're in academia now and as a scholar, you're educated enough to know the standard conventions of paper writing.

At least, that's what I understood. IDK how to connect to the international level. @____@ I did find this on Google though:

“I would say, in sum, that most people stand between two kinds of discourse communities: local discourse communities, groups of readers and writers who habitually work together in companies, colleges, departments, neighborhoods, government agencies, or other groups defined by specific demographic features; and global discourse communities, groups of writers and readers defined exclusively by a commitment to particular kinds of discourse practices and preferences, regardless of where and with whom they work” (121). (from "M. Jimmie Killingsworth’s “Discourse Communities–Local and Global.” (1992))

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WandereroftheDeep
Post #580520 - Reply to (#580506) by flowinmyboat
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9:56 pm, Dec 14 2012
Posts: 494


Quote from flowinmyboat
Quote from WandereroftheDeep
I'm sorry, but a simile is not an analogy between two things with the use of "like" or "as"; a simile is a metaphor which contains "like" or "as". Be careful not to confuse "like" and "as"; "as" can only be used if the first and the second elem ...


What?? A metaphor and simile are two different things (I've heard the argument that a simile is a type of metaphor before but I don't think it's acknowledged). " Similes states that A is like B, a metaphor states that A is B or substitutes B for A." The point is that A and B are different entities that you are comparing to each other.

"A simile is a figure of speech that directly compares two different things, usually by employing the words "like" or "as" – also, but less commonly, "if", or "than""

ex. busy as a bee (you aren't a bee but as busy as one)
Mary flies like a dove (Human's can't fly but if they could Mary would fly like a dove--i.e. elegently)
They fought like cats and dogs.(They fought aggressively like dogs and cats would--since dogs and cats don't like each other)


Really, the only difference between a simile and a metaphor is that a simile contains "like" or "as". I have a BA in English, and my literature professors litterally said, and confirmed in writing, that this is the difference between a simile and a metaphor.
"Busy as a bee" is an exception, because it's a fossilised expression; it isn't subjected to modern grammatical constraints.
Moreover, I don't want to be told I don't know the difference between a metaphor and a simile by someone who doesn't spell properly.

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flowinmyboat
Post #580532 - Reply to (#580520) by WandereroftheDeep
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12:54 am, Dec 15 2012
Posts: 65


Quote from WandereroftheDeep
Really, the only difference between a simile and a metaphor is that a simile contains "like" or "as". I have a BA in English, and my literature professors litterally said, and confirmed in writing, that this is the difference between a simile and a metaphor.
"Busy as a bee&quo ...


Um, okay. You spelled literally as "litterally"...so check your spelling before insulting mine! Though, you were probably typing quickly like me, which results in things like that.

My prof said they both fall under analogies; it's a case of differing opinions. Still, similes aren't literal comparisons like you implied...

*edit: In any case, this is a homework help thread! If you wanna keep this going, PM me! : )

Last edited by flowinmyboat at 1:01 am, Dec 15

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neonkitty
Post #580656 - Reply to (#580470) by chineserider
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11:01 pm, Dec 15 2012
Posts: 318


Quote from chineserider
This seems helpful.
https://sites.google.com/site/danielepitcher/outcome-d

Quote from jelzin89
well...for what purpose do you describe something?

writing and culture are interconnected.one social aspect.
writing enables people, communities, states... to interact with each other. especially when they are far apart(geographically). a lot to write about


Thank you guys. (:

Last edited by neonkitty at 12:12 am, Jan 24

neonkitty
Post #584956
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12:29 am, Jan 24 2013
Posts: 318


First off, I know double posts are not allowed but, since my last comment was written over a month ago am I allowed to type a new question so I can give this thread a "bump" while I'm at it?
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Onto the real thing I need help on.
So basically I have to do a short assignment due real soon but I have no idea how to organize my information. I know that there are endless ways to form my assignment but what would be the best way?
Here's the assignment:

For this assignment, you are to find at least two contemporary accounts of a speech. Summarize what they say about the speech. Describe the audience to which these accounts are addressed. How was the speech received by its audience? You will turn in a 2-3 page paper discussing the historical context and the reception of the speech.

Basically, I'm just asking for an outline that neatly organizes my info. smile

story645
Post #584968 - Reply to (#584956) by neonkitty
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2:46 am, Jan 24 2013
Posts: 506


So, not an outline, but might help you focus your paper:
SOAPStone

It's also hard not knowing what your thesis is, 'cause the standard 5 paragraph structure follows straight off your essay.

thesis: Although CA1 argues A and CA2 argues B, they both come to conclusion C about the speech.

P1: how CA1 goes about arguing A using SOAPStone analysis
P2: how CA2 goes about arguing B using SOAPStone analysis
P3: how CA1 & CA2 goes about arguing C using SOAPStone analysis

conclusion

neonkitty
Post #584970 - Reply to (#584968) by story645
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2:57 am, Jan 24 2013
Posts: 318


Quote from story645
So, not an outline, but might help you focus your paper:
SOAPStone[/url]

It's also hard not knowing what your thesis is, 'cause the standard 5 paragraph structure follows straight off your essay.

thesis: Although CA1 argues A and CA2 argues B, they both come to conclusion C about the speech.

P1: how C ...


I thought about it and I'm going to do this. Simple but easy to follow. smile

I regret not asking my instructor this but when he is asking for two contemporary accounts of the speech, do they have to be newspaper articles and other writings, or can they be responses(video) from a news broadcast for example?

story645
Post #585022 - Reply to (#584970) by neonkitty
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8:34 pm, Jan 24 2013
Posts: 506


Quote from neonkitty
I regret not asking my instructor this but when he is asking for two contemporary accounts of the speech, do they have to be newspaper articles and other writings, or can they be responses(video) from a news broadcast for example?

Dunno, you really need to send him an email asking him 'cause every instructor is different.


neonkitty
Post #585739 - Reply to (#585022) by story645
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1:17 am, Jan 31 2013
Posts: 318


Quote from story645
Dunno, you really need to send him an email asking him 'cause every instructor is different.

Everything went well. I got a 40/40. bigrazz
- - - - - - - - - - - -
Biology Lab homework help. ~_~"


Head CT Scan (2 mSv)
Airplane flight from New York to LA (40 µsv)

• Radiation exposure of 4 Sv can be lethal.
• REMEMBER YOUR METRICS PREFIXES!!

22. How many airplane flights from New York to Los Angeles (or from LA back to NY) would you have to take to have the same amount of radiation as a single CT Scan?


Last edited by neonkitty at 1:23 am, Jan 31

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